There have been some LinkedIn discussions about why the mining industry needs to attract more young people.  One of the selling points often mentioned is how mining gives a person the opportunity to experience the world.
Based on my own career, mining has definitely provided me with a chance to travel the world.  It will also help anyone overcome their fear of travel.   One will also learn that both international and domestic travel can be as equally rewarding.  There is nothing wrong with learning more about your own country.
The main purpose for my mining travel was due to either being a QP on a 43-101 study or visiting a site as a member of a due diligence team.   Other reasons have been to provide engineering support at a mine site or to meet with management teams for risk or strategy planning sessions.
Over the last year I haven’t traveled as much as in the past.  One reason is that not every QP working on a 43-101 report has to make a site visit. Fortunately, even when one doesn’t make a site visit, one still learns something about the local politics, legal system, infrastructure, and socio-economic situation in that country.
The map below shows places where I have been in my travels.  It also shows the locations of studies I was involved it. Mining really is a global business.   My map isn’t as cluttered as that of some geologists I know.  Exploration and resource geologists will visit many more destinations that an engineer will. After all, every project needs exploration drilling and a resource estimate, but not all projects advance to the engineering stage.

For those thinking of getting into mining, here is my list of pros and cons based on my own travel experience. Not everything is great about travel but some aspects of it can be fantastic.

What’s Good

  • I had the opportunity to visit many places for which there is a zero probability that I would have ever gone as a tourist.
  • Typically long duration long distance flights are in business class. You get lounge access and the perks associated with executive travel.   Less onerous short flights might be economy only, so be aware of your company policy.
  • All travel expenses, hotels, taxis, meals, etc. are paid for.  Just don’t get too exorbitant when wining and dining.  That’s the job of the senior person you are travelling with.
  • Upon arrival, often there will be a company representative to meet you at the airport.  They speak the local language and will take you where you need to go.  This saves you scrambling around an airport looking for a safe taxi to use.
  • You will get to meet local employees, go to dinner with them, travel around their country, and chat in the evenings. It’s a great way to learn about the people in the country you are visiting.
  • You will get to meet other technical people from around the world.  They might be expats working at a mine site or simply part of a multidisciplinary engineering team on the same visit.
  • You will be whisked away from tourist traps and thus have an opportunity to see the real countryside.
  • You will hit the ground running, get to visit mine sites, see some real live rocks, drill core, pit walls, equipment at work, and things happening.  You won’t get to see that while sitting in your downtown office.

What’s not so good

  • Unfortunately business trips are mostly of a very short duration since you’re not going there as a tourist.  You’re being paid for your time and expertise.

  • Mining trips are usually not to majors centers, so once arriving in the country you really haven’t arrived yet.  There might be more air flights or long pickup truck rides to get to the final destination. There can be a lot of waiting and the days can be long (and frustrating).   I remember on trip in northern Russia where four of us with luggage were jammed into a Volkswagen Rabbit in a snowstorm. That two hour trip took five hours, but we were just happy to make it back to the hotel.
  • Sometimes your accommodations will be less than stellar, i.e. one star hotels or tents.  So you’ll need to learn how to appreciate the charm of those places and not complain that it isn’t the Four Seasons Hotel.
  • Some travel locations can be potentially unsafe and require travelling security. That can lead to a bit of uneasiness.  I recall a trip to northern Mexico where we had two armed guards travelling with us.  I’m not sure if they were really needed and it was strangely more calming without them once they left.
  • Long east-west trips can leave you jet lagged and dog-tired. However the expectation is that at 7 am next morning you’re ready for breakfast and then head straight into the office.  You’re being paid to get to work, not to sleep.
  • The site visits will be focused on collecting or reviewing data and then immediately travelling back home to write your report.  Sightseeing opportunities can be limited other than what you will see during the course of your work. Sometimes you’ll get back home and think that you never really saw the place.

Conclusion

Business travel has always been one of the best parts of my mining career.   I can remember the details about a lot of the travel that I did.   Unfortunately the project details themselves will blur with those of other projects.
When I do travel now, it’s a nice change if just one flight gets you to your final destination.
During this Covid period, international travel is greatly restricted.  It will be interesting to see how soon things can return to normal, if they ever do.   To miss out on the travel aspect of a mining career would be a shame, unless the only travel you want to experience is sitting on public transit for a few hours each day.
By the way, my all time favorite place for a mining trip is…..Argentina.  It’s a long way from Toronto, but well worth it.

 

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